Garden / Open Day this Saturday

So after the circus show and Words in the Warehouse, we want to start doing more regular open days.

Once again, the space will be open from 1pm to 5pm this Saturday (19th).

The other news is that the garden collective has started to get its shit together. They’ll be having an open ‘work day’ on the garden on Saturday at the same time as the open day. They’re very open to new people getting involved, so if you’re interested in gardening you should definitely come along to this.

(The picture above gives a taste of what the garden looked like in its full glory last year. Obviously this has all been destroyed now. But it’s what we’re aiming to recreate!)

Words in the Warehouse is back!

The Phoenix Has Risen!

This Friday, 4th March — gates open at 7pm.

If you’ve been before, come again!

If you haven’t been before and you like poetry/music/art/performance art/experimental fun weird stuff and craic come along!

Words in the Warehouse

The people who are actually organising Words in the Warehouse are too busy doing that to write something for the website. I think it would be a shame though, especially for people who have never been to Words in the Warehouse before, if there was nothing written about it here. My perspective is that of somebody who’s heavily invested in the ‘squatting’ community in Dublin, but who doesn’t have any natural inclination towards or interest in poetry or spoken word or whatever.

I remember the first Words in the Warehouse back in 2014. It wasn’t too long after the Squatters Convergence. It was in November, under a full moon. I didn’t recognise the significance of it at all at the time. I just kind of thought “I guess it’s cool that all these arty people are doing their arty shit in our warehouse”.

But the thing is, that was only the first one. There was another one, on the winter solstice that year. And then another in February. And then another in April, the ‘last ever’ ;). And each one was bigger than the one that preceded it. While the Squatters Convergence may have had more people overall than the first Words in the Warehouses, those people were all already squatters! Words in the Warehouse set a precedent that we could open up the space to non-squatters, host them at huge events, and get away with it. This wasn’t obvious to us at all before the first Words in the Warehouse.

In a way, Words in the Warehouse became bigger than the space itself. It did more to promote squatting in Dublin than anything the ‘squatters’ had done up to that point. It brought people into contact with squatting who would never otherwise have been introduced to it, and they left with an incredibly positive impression of it. There are complete randomers who don’t really know anything about squatting but who have still somehow heard of Words in the Warehouse.

Even as someone who isn’t particularly into and doesn’t really ‘get’ poetry and spoken word, I’ve always enjoyed Words in the Warehouse nights. The atmosphere is incredible. Just having that many people in a liberated space, especially a space as vast as Squat City, feels really empowering. When we use the space to its full potential like that, it feels like we’re totally ungovernable.

But for people who are into poetry and spoken word, the reason Words in the Warehouse is so great is because it creates a space for voices who don’t normally have one. The literary scene in Ireland is dominated by older males, while Words in the Warehouse is organised by women and the performers are overwhelmingly queer, young and female (compared to the rest of the literary scene). Understanding that makes me feel stupid for thinking Words in the Warehouse was just some arty shite, and not realising how political it was all along!

Anyway, to conclude, I think we’re all really happy that Words in the Warehouse is happening again. To me, it really symbolises and solidifies the idea that ‘we’re back’. Especially as everybody was saying that the one last April would be the ‘last ever’ Words in the Warehouse, it feels so sweet to prove them wrong, even to prove ourselves wrong about that.